How Can We Afford Drug Rehab?

by | May 18, 2015 | Treatment | 7 comments

can we afford drug rehab

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“Oh God, we cannot afford this. We will have to take out a loan, or another mortgage on our house, or deplete our retirement funds or borrow from relatives. And what about families who have no resources at all – what in the world do they do?”

Those were my first thoughts almost five years ago, back in August 2010, when I first heard about the sometimes astounding costs of inpatient drug rehab for my addicted son. I was wrong; there were options available so that we could, and did, afford to send Sam to rehab.

Worried Couple Discussing Domestic Finances At HomeSo, I thought it might be helpful to parents who are just starting down this long road of researching drug rehabs to talk a little bit about rehab costs, and hopefully reassure you that there are ways you can afford to send your beloved child to a reputable, qualified inpatient rehab without complete financial destruction.

Financial Issues

As parents who love your children, you are naturally terrified about your beloved child’s situation. And on top of all the complexities that dealing with an addict entails, you now have to confront the issues of finances, and insurance.

It can all seem completely overwhelming. I understand. I have been there, twice, in fact. As you may already know from my previous blog articles, my oldest son, Sam, now 25 years old, is a recovering addict who thankfully has been drug free for a little over four years now.

But during the course of his treatment and recovery he went through two separate inpatient rehab programs, along with two intensive outpatient programs (IOPs), and two sober living facilities. And that is not even counting the numerous therapists, psychiatrists and medical doctors we consulted before Sam finally admitted his drug addiction.

Anyway, when I first heard about the costs of inpatient drug rehab, I was terrified.

What Does Inpatient Rehab Cost?

For purposes of this article I did an informal survey of seventy inpatient rehabs that were reviewed on the addiction and recovery website, www.thefix.com. This survey included rehabs from all over the United States.

Rehab prices ranged from a high of an astounding $90,000 per month for the ultimate “luxury” experience, to $4,700 per month, with an average monthly cost of about $28,000 per month. Clearly, the services and facilities varied widely, as did the staff qualifications, philosophies, and outcomes, of the various treatment centers.

It is really important, in fact, essential, to do your homework to determine which facility is best for your child. A higher price tag does not always equal a better experience, or more importantly, a more qualified staff or a better outcome.

What about Insurance?

Under the Affordable Care Act, the relevant provisions of which were not in effect when Sam first went to rehab, insurers are now prohibited from denying coverage for pre-existing conditions, including substance abuse.

Health insurance form with stethoscopeMore importantly, insurers must provide coverage for mental health and substance abuse treatment on the same level with regular medical care. In other words, health insurance companies are now required to cover some level of substance abuse treatment.

However most insurers place restrictions on addiction treatment coverage, such as requiring the addict to exhaust all outpatient rehab opportunities before they will provide coverage for inpatient rehab, or limiting the number of days in inpatient rehab.

So it is important to talk to your insurer, and determine your individual substance abuse coverage. Some rehabs, including Amethyst, can help in negotiating the amount and type of addiction coverage with your insurance company.

Talk About Cost with the Rehab

There are rehabs that are willing to work with you on the price. Some rehabs will provide payment plans or even partial scholarships for addicts and their families who are without health insurance (i.e., self pay), or who are truly in need.

Amethyst, for example, does all of the above. So, in addition to talking to your health insurance company, talk to the rehab facility staff about your individual financial situation to see what pricing plans or adjustments might be available.

The Best for Your Addicted Son or Daughter

We all want the very best treatment for our addicted children, and many of us are willing to pay any amount of money to “fix” the problem. But a high price is no guarantee of the best services or most qualified rehab personnel.

Cheerful extended family standing at parkSo, do your research. Investigate several rehabs to find the best one for your son or daughter. Talk to your insurance company about substance abuse coverage. Also, talk to the rehab staff to see what pricing alternatives or plans they offer, and whether they will assist you in negotiating coverage with your insurance company.

A Long Journey to Recovery

But please keep in mind; sometimes money is just not enough. Your addicted son or daughter must be willing and open to begin the difficult process of recovery. Initially Sam was not, and his recovery was far from a smooth ride.

His first rehab was not a good fit, maybe partly because he was not yet genuinely committed to real recovery. He went from that first rehab to homelessness, then back to rehab, and on to sober living, relapse, jail, detox, a suicide threat, a second rehab, and a year in sober living.

But I can very gratefully say that he celebrated four years of sobriety this past April, and I pray that, God willing, my wonderful son will continue to remain drug free. I am of course ridiculously proud of him for his courage and hard work, and his tireless efforts to give back to others with this terrible disease.

I send my very best wishes and prayers to every addict, every parent, and every family member out there who is dealing with the horrific disease of addiction. And I wish each one of you success in finding reputable, cost-effective treatment leading to long-term recovery.

Laurie Kesaris
May 2015

7 Comments

  1. Kathy Berman

    You have done a great overview here and I’ve saved your site as a good referral for my readers. I have been following you on Facebook. I went to a recovery home for females in 1976 that was very frugal. We did all the work in the home and rotated jobs which I believe helped me as much as anything. It was quite progressive–individual therapy, group therapy, meditation, AA in the home and out at other sites, and prayer. We worked the 12 steps daily around the dining table for an hour a day. I left having worked Steps 1-6 which is how it was done in the early days. They have worked for me for 38+ years.

    Reply
    • Laurie Kesaris

      Dear Kathy,
      Thank you so much for your kind words about the article. I am grateful you found it helpful. And wow – congratulations on more than 38 years of sobriety!! You’re absolutely right – a recovery home like the one you describe was very progressive at the time in 1976. You are a true inspiration. Very best wishes to you, and thank you again for writing.
      Laurie Kesaris

      Reply
  2. Janet Creason

    Hi I have read over your sight time and time again but this is the first time I am leaving any kind of response. All I read about are parents with addicted children and you guys are life changing for them ( the kids) for sure if the child is open and willing but I have a different and desperate situation,Me, I am 53 and have fought this addiction disease for most of my adult life! I haven’t had any treatment that comes close to what you offer, the individual counselling , removing myself from current surroundings, just everything I’ve read makes me feel like there really is a light (life) at the end of the tunnel!! I want so so so much to be off the drugs and to live a real normal life, to be a real Mom and Grandmother , it’s all I think about every minute of every day. I absolutely hate myself like this and I need real help to get clean , not just a few days know detox! If you were to look at me you would never know I was on anything and on the inside I am slowly dying on day at a time! I hate living this Big Lie , please help me! Help me ! I have no where else to turn!
    Sincerely Janet

    Reply
    • Laurie Kesaris

      Dear Janet — You are brave to ask for help. Give the staff at Amethyst a call – 954-610-7151, and I know they will do everything they can to guide you.
      Many prayers and best wishes,
      Laurie Kesaris

      Reply
  3. Debra

    Hi Laurie,

    I have been researching rehabs for over a week now, and have found the folks at Amethyst to be outstanding. They are willing to help no matter what, and have answered my calls faithfully when I was in a panic watching my son go through withdrawals. He had four clean years in March and relapsed when his wife left him. He went to rehab in CA, which helped tremendously, but now, I am unsure that is the right place for him. I definitely think Ean and Jarret will help me find the best place for him to go this time, where he can build on his life-coping skills to prevent a second relapse. God Bless you for reaching out to others!

    Debbie

    Reply
    • Laurie Kesaris

      Dear Debbie,
      Thank you so much for writing. Yes, the Amethyst staff are all very experienced, dedicated professionals, and they all try very hard to help when they can. I wish they had been here when my son (who now is part of their staff) needed rehab! I know these guys will do everything they can to help your son. Also — please remember to look out for yourself — you will need guidance and support just as much as your son does as you move forward. Many prayers and best wishes to you both,
      Laurie

      Reply
  4. Jo-Ann

    Hi Laurie,
    I am new to your site but have been so interested in everything people are writing. My daughter has been on methadone for almost 8 years and can’t seem to get off of it. I have read pros and cons about methadone and even though I hate the thoughts of her maybe needing to be on it the rest of her life, if it saves her life I will except it. She is only 31 and I just can’t see a 60 year old woman having to go to a clinic every day. She has a child and I feel so sad that my grandchild has to be brought up with an addict for a mother. The clinic don’t seem to be much of a help when it comes time to come off of the methadone. If I only could get some help some where. Thank you. Jo-Ann

    Reply

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