How Oxycodone Will Make You Feel

by | Last updated Jan 19, 2022 | Published on Jan 19, 2022 | Oxycodone | 0 comments

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There’s been more than $21 billion worth of OxyContin sold in the US since 2010. As one of the most popular prescription painkillers, oxycodone has been at the top of the opioid epidemic in the US. Understanding how oxycodone makes you feel and recognizing the early signs of dependence might help you prevent addiction or help someone misusing their medication. 

How An Oxycodone High Feels Like

Oxycodone is prescribed to treat extreme pain – usually after surgery or cancer treatment. An oxycodone high feels like a sudden surge of euphoria, very similar to the one user’s experience with heroin or morphine. Most opioids work by blocking pain receptors in the brain and releasing dopamine into the system. These two factors are what cause the euphoric feelings oxycodone users experience. And, because it’s such a potent painkiller, sometimes the high can last for up to six hours. Read on to learn five things to know about oxycodone high. 

1. You’ll Feel Happier

It only takes oxycodone 30 minutes to start working. When users follow their prescription instructions, they might feel a sense of calmness and happiness. However, when people misuse and abuse the medication, they’ll feel happier, almost euphoric. That first euphoric sensation is almost impossible to recreate, which is why people continue to take larger doses or experiment with other drugs in the hopes of recreating it. Some users might try to crush and break the pill to snort it or inject it to get a more intense high. 

2. Feeling Slow or Detached

As an opioid, oxycodone effects are very similar to those of heroin. Most users experience relaxation, reduced anxiety, and drowsiness. But, since opioids calm the central nervous system, users high on oxycodone often feel detached from their bodies and the world around them. Many experience symptoms of unresponsiveness and feel slow to react to outside stimuli. 

3. Things Around Feel More Pleasing

Because oxycodone calms the central nervous system and users are essentially numb to pain, things around them tend to feel more pleasing. When they’re high on oxycodone, most people love how tables feel and will even hug the walls or other surfaces around them because they experience them differently. 

4. Sleepiness

Since oxycodone makes users feel relaxed, many experience drowsiness and sleepiness. One of the most dangerous side effects of opioids is sleepiness. This is why users are not encouraged to drive or engage in any activity that requires their full attention. In some cases, users high on oxycodone can fall asleep without noticing, mainly because they’re so detached from their bodies and senses that they can’t control their system anymore. 

5. Sudden Slurred Speech

The same numbing effects can affect the thought process, which involves speech. A quick way to know if someone is high on opioids is by listening to them talk. Users will often cut words and have noticeably slurred speech while under the influence. Over time, slurred speech and cognitive impairment may become permanent. 

How Long Does an Oxycodone High Last?

It takes oxycodone between 30 to 60 minutes to start acting in the system. However, depending on the dosage and the type of oxycodone medication, euphoric feelings can last between three to six hours. Of course, other factors such as age, metabolism, and even gender, may affect how long someone’s high lasts and how long it takes their system to metabolize the drug. 

Signs of Oxycodone Overdose

If you or someone you know is taking oxycodone, it’s paramount to learn how to recognize the signs of an oxycodone overdose. Most opioid overdoses can be instantly reversed with Naloxone. These are the most common overdose symptoms: 

  • Unconsciousness
  • Small pupils
  • Hypoventilation
  • Low blood pressure
  • Weak pulse
  • Coma
  • Drowsiness
  • Seizures

Getting Help for Addiction

As with many addictions, oxycodone addiction can be treated. Like many opioids, the first step to recovery is detox. This will provide users with a safe and supportive environment to quit the substance while professionals help manage withdrawal symptoms. From there, a combination of medications and behavioral therapies in a rehab environment that caters to their needs will help them find long-lasting recovery. If you or someone you know is struggling with prescription painkiller addiction, reach out for help today. 

Sources:

https://www.nhs.uk/medicines/oxycodone/

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2009/020553s060lbl.pdf

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/pain-you-can-get-help

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15339710/

Written by: Serene G.

Written by: Serene G.

Serene has over 8 years of marketing experience as well as a Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences with a dual concentration in Biological Sciences and Social and Behavioral Sciences. While completing this degree, she completed numerous courses pertaining to substance abuse and mental health, such as Drugs and Behavior, Health Behavior and Society, and Substance Abuse Prevention, Treatment, and Policy. She is also called to help those who struggle with addiction because she has seen multiple loved ones struggle with substance abuse. Today, Serene uses her knowledge, background, and passion to educate and connect with individuals and families afflicted by addiction.

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