5 Factors That Affect How Long Drug Rehab Lasts

by | Last updated Dec 27, 2021 | Published on Sep 14, 2020 | Rehab, Treatment | 0 comments

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Whether it is because of kids, a pet, your job, financial reasons, or just wanting to get back to life, it is normal to want to know long drug rehab is. It is also normal for family members to wonder how long their loved one will be in a rehab facility or when they will come home. How long rehab takes can affect various factors from what arrangements need to be made to how much treatment will cost. Although you may have heard of 30, 60, and 90-day treatment programs, the reality is that how long someone is going to be in treatment can vary greatly. Depending on these 5 considerations, drug & alcohol rehab may be longer or shorter.

1. Insurance Coverage

Money should not be an issue, but it often is. Those who have health insurance may be relying on their coverage to pay for treatment. However, what an insurance provider covers can be limited and often varies from one plan to another. Every individual deserves access to a full spectrum of treatment, but insurance companies often only cover what is determined to be medically necessary. In other words, if a 90-day residential treatment program is not deemed necessary, then insurance may not cover this length of care. This commonly plays a role in how long someone stays in a rehab program. Treatment facilities will usually work with the caregivers and insurance companies to provide coverage for the longest and highest level of care that can reasonably be determined as a medical necessity.

2. Health & Co-Occurring Disorders

Based on someone’s mental and physical health when they are entering treatment, their recovery process may vary. Typically an individual that is in better health, mentally and physically, is able to heal and progress through the program quicker. On the other hand, the brain and body of someone who has physical health issues may not be able to bounce back as smoothly. They may even have additional health issues that arise during recovery. Also, an individual with a mental health disorder, or dual diagnosis, may need additional attention and programming that lengthens their treatment plan. Both the mind and body play a major role in recovery, meaning both areas of health can affect how long rehab is for an individual.

3. History With Drug Use & Treatment

On top of a patient’s general health, their history with drug use and treatment will often contribute to the suggested treatment plan and ultimately could affect how long their drug rehab stay will last. The longer substance use has occurred, the more severe the detox process could be. It may be more difficult to overcome the first weeks or months of sobriety and could extend their time in rehab.

Additionally, if someone has a history with treatment, this means that their past treatment plans were not successful. Oftentimes, higher levels of care and longer recovery programs are recommended for those who have relapsed multiple times in the past. The goal is for this time to be the last time in rehab, even if it means a more intensive treatment plan.

4. Clinical Progress

The team of clinical professionals managing care at a treatment program will document and track each patient’s progress throughout rehab. These notes are used to determine if a patient is ready to progress to a lower level of care, to move back home, etc. They are also used to provide recommendations to the insurance companies on whether continued treatment is needed. This factor alone can play a significant role in how long rehab is for each individual.

5. Support & Homelife

Family, friends, and home life also play a major role in recovery and relapse prevention. When someone does not have a safe and supportive home environment, their risk of relapse goes up significantly. In this case, they may be advised to stay longer in a residential treatment program and/or to live in a sober living facility while they continue with outpatient treatment and work to find a better living arrangement.

Written by: nick

Written by: nick

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