What Does Transitional Housing Mean for a Recovering Addict?

by | Last updated May 12, 2022 | Published on May 6, 2022 | Rehab Aftercare | 0 comments

what-does-transitional-housing-mean

Home » Rehab Aftercare » What Does Transitional Housing Mean for a Recovering Addict?

When you leave addiction treatment, you’re making a monumental step in your recovery journey. However, with that comes a lot of responsibility. Many people dread the day they complete rehab out of fear of relapsing once they leave treatment. For many, moving into traditional housing can be the next step in their long-term recovery journey. Read on to learn more about this option for early sobriety.

What is Transitional Housing?

Transitional housing, also known as sober living homes, are fully furnished home-like living accommodations. These apartments provide a safe and stable space for people leaving intense addiction rehab programs. Transitional houses are considered a more flexible structure than a typical treatment center, but residents are still expected to follow the rules and have specific responsibilities. 

Transitional housing benefits include:

  • It provides a safe space to learn how to live with others
  • Teaches residents about budgeting and adjusting to sober living
  • Residents learn about time management and accountability
  • It helps with behavioral control after treatment
  • Helps residents find new life purposes and build a long-term life plan

Benefits of Transitional Housing for Recovering Addicts

Although everyone’s early recovery stage differs, transitional housing can benefit recovering addicts. Mainly for individuals without a healthy support system at home or those that live in toxic or triggering environments. The National Institute on Drug Abuse recommends at least a 90 days stay to obtain maximum benefits. 

Easier Transition to Sober Living

It’s relatively common for people to relapse after leaving addiction treatment. When people are faced with the flexibilities of sober living and the triggers in their environment, it’s more common for them to relapse. Transitional housing maintains specific rules, responsibilities, and expectations that help keep some structure as people navigate their newfound sobriety.

Ongoing Sober Living Support

Many individuals tend to feel isolated when leaving the treatment center. Transitional housing facilities help people continue their recovery journey. People must stay sober, fulfill their obligations, and attend group meetings. Having reliable sources of support can make a difference. 

Provide Aftercare Planning

When people leave a rehab facility frequently, they don’t have an aftercare program to follow. Sober living homes can offer a more structured way of living that maintains some treatment fundamentals. For example, people living in transitional living homes must find employment, are expected to clean and cook, must pay rent, and keep their living spaces clean. They may be required to check in at specific times every night. They should attend group meetings weekly and so forth. 

How to Get Into Transitional Housing

You need to apply to get into a transitional housing program. Each program has its own set of rules, for example:

  • Applicants must detox and be committed to long-term sobriety for acceptance.
  • Residents must fulfill all household duties, including paying rent, to stay. 
  • Attending all house meetings and support group meetings are required.
  • Residents should stay a minimum of 90 days.
  • No drugs, alcohol, violence, or overnight guests are tolerated. 
  • Residents agree to be subject to random drug and alcohol screenings. 

Initially, you should reach out to your addiction treatment center and ask for a reference. In most cases, rehab facilities have standing partnerships with sober living homes in the area they can recommend you to. Otherwise, check out your county’s website for transitional housing facilities in the area. Follow the instructions to apply closely and meet all the requirements. 

Keep in mind that there aren’t many transitional housing facilities, and occupancy is very limited. Because of this, you should consider alternative options such as enrolling in an aftercare program or an alumni program at a rehab facility. While these aren’t live-in options, they can provide a sense of structure and much-needed support in early sobriety. 

Finding Help for Early Sobriety

The first months after leaving treatment can be pretty challenging. It’s important to seek ongoing group support by attending peer-support meetings like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA). Sober living facilities can provide an excellent place for recovering from addiction for those without a support system at home. 

Ask your case manager or therapist about your options and learn about the different transitional housing opportunities near you. Addiction recovery is a long-term process that requires constantly checking in with yourself, your environment, and your actions. Transitional housing might be the best option for you. 

Sources:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3057870/

Written by: newamethyst

Written by: newamethyst

The Amethyst Recovery Center Editorial team is comprised of individuals who are passionate about addiction recovery. We hope to contribute to the recovery journey through personal stories, insights, and informational content pieces.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Recent Articles

Slip vs Relapse: What’s The Difference?

Addiction is an all-consuming disease that can have us do, say, and think things we never would otherwise. It can cause us to abandon our instincts for self-preservation and ultimately turn us into a version of ourselves that we no longer recognize. It’s only natural...

Breaking Down the Serenity Prayer

We recently broke down the AA Preamble into separate parts, noting that it was important to understand the text which begins every AA meeting. But the Preamble doesn’t technically begin every meeting. Both AA and NA meetings generally start with the Serenity Prayer....

Reading Guide for ‘We Agnostics’

The target audience for “We Agnostics” is relatively easy to define. (aga7ta/Shutterstock) Groups such as AA and NA have many detractors, people who believe that they are religious organizations or even cults. This misconception extends to 12-based treatment centers,...

Follow Us

24/7 Help for Drug & Alcohol Use

If you or someone you love is suffering from the addiction, there is no reason to delay. Start working on a solution today. Our phones are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Our staff are trained to deal with drug and alcohol problems of any kind, and will recommend the right treatment for you based on your situation. Call now!

(888) 447-7724

Related Articles

Slip vs Relapse: What’s The Difference?
Slip vs Relapse: What’s The Difference?

Addiction is an all-consuming disease that can have us do, say, and think things we never would otherwise. It can cause us to abandon our instincts for self-preservation and ultimately turn us into a version of ourselves that we no longer recognize. It’s only natural...

read more
Breaking Down the Serenity Prayer
Breaking Down the Serenity Prayer

We recently broke down the AA Preamble into separate parts, noting that it was important to understand the text which begins every AA meeting. But the Preamble doesn’t technically begin every meeting. Both AA and NA meetings generally start with the Serenity Prayer....

read more
Reading Guide for ‘We Agnostics’
Reading Guide for ‘We Agnostics’

The target audience for “We Agnostics” is relatively easy to define. (aga7ta/Shutterstock) Groups such as AA and NA have many detractors, people who believe that they are religious organizations or even cults. This misconception extends to 12-based treatment centers,...

read more

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This
Amethyst Recovery Center